Replace speed bumps with teflon.

Sales messages benefit from fluidity. Good copy compels, moving the reader along in much the same way a lovely garden invites a walk. At every turn, another point of interest beckons: keep going. The writer’s job is to make it easy for the customer, with stepping stones that keep him on a sure-footed path.

However, different ideas in succession can act like speed bumps. A well-chosen connector is like a little piece of teflon that helps the reader scoot into the next thought. There are lots of ways to accomplish this; copywriting ace Max Ross offers the following examples (adapted from: The Greatest Direct Mail Sales Letters of All Time; Richard S. Hodgson; ISBN 85013-238-X):

  • But that’s not all.
  • Now—here is the most important part.
  • And in addition . . .
  • Better yet . . .
  • You will see for yourself why . . .
  • So that is why . . .
  • More important than that . . .
  • What is more . . .
  • But there is just one thing.
  • Make up your mind now to . . .
  • Take advantage of this opportunity to . . .
  • Now—for a limited time only—
  • Here is your chance to . . .

To Max’s list, I’ll add a few of my own:

  • It gets even better.
  • Now, consider this.
  • On top of that . . .
  • But the good news doesn’t stop there.
  • One more thing.
  • You’ll also like knowing . . .
  • Before I forget . . .
  • Here’s the kicker.
  • Not only that . . .

Connectors are not persuaders in themselves. But they help create a persuasive message by giving it forward movement. They keep customers from stumbling on the way, so they can finish unimpeded and ready to act.

What do you think?